Indigenous Ministry Videos

Policy Goals are established to progress the Purpose
Policy Limits are defined that help preserve and defend the Purpose
Working Group and Community of Faith Tools, Processes, and Resources have been designed that progress the Purpose

Contemplating Reconciliation After the Papal Visit

We take time to reflect upon the repercussions of the Pope's visit to Canada and the impacts of the apologies that were delivered across the country.

Red Dress Day Commemoration Service 2022

A Service of Commemoration, honouring the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and Two-Spirit Persons, and those who grieve their loss. With people participating online and in person, the service was recorded on May 5, 2022 at Rundle Memorial United Church, Banff, on lands held sacred by many the Stoney Nakoda (Chiniki, Bearspaw and Wesley nations) the Blackfoot Confederacy (Siksika, Piikani and Kainai), the Tsuut'ina, and the Metis People of Alberta Region 3.

The service was led by Gloria Snow, Elder Glenda Crawler, Trudy Wesley, Kauanoe Hoomanawanui, Tony Snow and Ken Levi (Levae).

Red Dress Day 2022 Video

We commemorate the lives of women, girls and Two-Spirit People on Red Dress Day and look at our calling to be allies, supporters and advocates of change to address the issues that affect vulnerable populations. We are called as part of TRC Call to Action #41 to support the work of the MMIWG2S+ Inquiry Final Report: “Reclaiming Power and Place” to build strategies and solutions to address the ongoing losses in our communities (both on reserve and in the urban settings).

May we each feel called to do our work in support of our most vulnerable in the Indigenous community.

Indigenous Lenten Series 2022: Session 5

Recorded April 5, 2022: We take time on this Lenten journey to hear the wisdom of Rev. Andrew Ahenakew. His leading voice helped shaped practice for the Anglican Church of Canada and supported the work of the Ecumenical Conference beyond the foothills at Morley, As we think about how each Elder took their message into communities far and wide across North America, we remember that the voice of the their convictions focused on the teachings they had been given, their upbringings and their call to bring healing to the people. We thank all those who continue this work and the work of ministry at this difficult time in our history.

Indigenous Lenten Series 2022: Session 4

We welcome members of the Catholic faith at this important moment. During this same week, First Nations, Metis and Inuit representatives were at the Vatican to petition Pope Francis for apology for the residential schools. In this historic visit we reflect upon the purpose of this visit and the call to action that brings all faiths to account for their part in the terrible history of abuse and genocide that occurred at the residential schools. Our session was recorded on March 29, days before His Holiness delivered an apology on April 1 for the acts committed and concluded by agreeing to visit Canada in the near future. This momentous action was a surprise to all.  It began discernment in many dioceses in the Catholic world, with special impact on all denominations of Christianity in Canada to determine how they will advance the cause of reconciliation.

Indigenous Lenten Series 2022: Session 3

Recorded March 22, 2022. For this third session of our Indigenous Lenten Study we explore our connections to the Anglican Church of Canada through the work of the Rev. Ernest Willie, who attended and supported the ecumenical conference throughout the 1970s along with many Indigenous clergy from the Anglican Church. Our welcome from Indigenous Archbishop, Rev. Mark MacDonald opens our study with words of wisdom and encouragement as we honour their path walking beside us in this sacred circle. Special thanks to Sheila Cook for her contribution to our discussions.

Indigenous Lenten Series 2022: Session 2

Our second session of the Indigenous Lenten Series orients us to the Ecumenical Movement that brought Indigenous spiritual leaders and ecumenical partners to Morley to answer a call about our collective future. In this setting of the beautiful foothills and towering mountains, young people and old came to share stories, teachings and visions for the future. Among the leaders of this movement was Ernest Tootoosis, a Nehiyaw Holy Man, descendant of Poundmaker (a leader of the Cree with Nakoda lineage). In his stories and remembrances, Tootoosis embarked on decades of fellowship and teaching, traveling across the country and into the United States to share stories and to learn from others. This was true of other conference participants that they would travel to Indigenous communities far and wide to share and learn, just as the disciples had done. It was an important practice to open up their teachings to others in the hopes that they too would seek their own spiritual truths that had been gifted them by their Elders.

Indigenous Lenten Series 2022: Session 1

We commemorate International Women's Day during our first session of the Indigenous Lenten Series for 2022. Co-hosted by Students Minister Gloria Snow from the Stoney Nakoda First Nation, we welcome Elder Alberta Billy (We Wei Kai Nation), Dr. Rev. Bernice Saulteaux (Carry the Kettle First Nation), Glenda Crawler (Stoney Nakoda First Nation) and Marlene Lightning (Samson Cree Nation). We reflect upon the teachings of Indigenous Women Elders and their contribution to community stability, wellbeing and cultural education. This is an important legacy from the Indian Ecumenical Conference held at Morley from 1971-1985. Remembered in ceremony and prayer, It is the actions and voices of Indigenous women that are helping to raise awareness and bring balance to communities today.

 Pink Shirt Day February 23, 2022

We observe Pink Shirt Day with a session including trauma-informed professionals discussing anti-bullying, lateral violence and the legacy of residential schools on Indigenous communities. We remember that those children who were lost or murdered in acts of genocide had surviving families and communities that continue to live with the impacts of those atrocities. Through remembrance and cultural resiliency, the ways of healing are a long and complex path that must be traveled together.

Facilitated by Indigenous Minister Tony Snow, with guests Amanda Good Stoney, social worker; Teresa Snow who works in community wellness and healing and Rev. Dr. Carmen Landsdowne, First United Church, Vancouver.

Indigenous Veterans Day Nov 8 2021

Indigenous Veterans Day on November 8 is a time to remember the stories of our warriors as we reflect on the brave Indigenous men, women and families who sacrificed to serve this nation. Many warriors did not return home from foreign lands, those that returned faced disenfranchisement from their communities and lost their rights to return to their homes, to their families and to the lands of their people.

On Indigenous Veterans Day we remember the sacrifice of those brave warriors and the legacy they left to proud tribes of people as they joined the ancestors.

A Message for Thanksgiving 2021

During this Fall time of thanksgiving and beyond, it is a good reminder that while we are enjoying our bounty and blessings, we can offer some help and support to Indigenous families and Elders in need.

If you feel called to support, please offer your donation to the Indigenous Ministries Fund to help families and Elders this Thanksgiving. You can donate at: https://chinookwindsregion.ca/donate/ ahead.

Ecumenical Clergy Panel on Truth and Reconciliation Day 2021

On September 30, Indigenous Clergy experts from across Canada discussed reconciliation within their various churches and looked at ways of understanding the role of Indigenous ministry today. We welcomed Indigenous Bishop Mark MacDonald from the Anglican Church of Canada, Rev. John Snow Jr., from the United Church of Canada, Rev. Beryl St. Germain from the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, Rev. Fr. Cristino Bouvette from the Roman Catholic Diocese of Calgary and Rev. Dr. Danny Zacharias from the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada and Acadia Divinity College. Each ministry representiative brought a unique perspective and experience in the work toward reconciliation. We thank each of them for their witness and their advocacy within their denominations.

Truth and Reconciliation Day Sept 30 2021

Other Video Resources for Truth and Reconciliation Day

• Rev. John Snow on Orange Shirt Day: https://youtu.be/PMvfJuV2I_o

• Truth and Reconciliation Acknowledgement video by Tony Snow: https://youtu.be/lQ8Os0IaRyw

Other Ways to Mark Truth and Reconciliation Day on September 30th

• Individuals and Communities of Faith may want to spend time reading again The United Church of Canada’s 1986 Apology to Indigenous People, the 1988 response and the 1998 Apology to students of United Church Indian Residential Schools and their families and communities. Download the Apologies and Response HERE

• On Sunday, September 26 and 30, communities of faith and individuals are encouraged to wear Orange Shirts and post their photos. Details from the United Church’s Indigenous Ministries and Justice HERE

Treaty 7 Day on September 22, 2021

Video Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HRKUwk1J-I4&t=3327s

On the 144 Anniversary of the signing of Treaty 7, Tony Snow, Indigenous Minister for Chinook Winds provided leadership at the Regional Online Hall. We discussed the history of Treaty 7 and the perspectives of Indigenous peoples on the treaty signing. We were also introduced to the Ally Toolkit being developed for the Region by grassroots volunteers. The Ally Toolkit will be available in the weeks ahead. Keep an eye on this page as well as Chinook Winds newsletters.

World Indigenous Day Aug 9

All My Relations Day 2021

June 20 - Indigenous Sunday Regional Service

Prayer for the 215 Kamloops Children

Let us mourn the loss of 215 Children at the Kamloops Indian Residential School, as we remember those who never came home. The legacy of Residential Schools affects all Indigenous people. We see the grief of the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc Nation and those families whose children were taken to this school from other lands. It is a recurring story. It is an intentional story, a story of bias and assimilation and intolerance. There is grief at losing a whole generation for the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc people. A deep stain of injustice. A gaping wound that this community bears (like so many across this country) because of intolerance and ignorance and hate. Our call to be an Anti-Racist Denomination, our agreement to live out the TRC Calls to Action, the Articles of UNDRIP and the Calls To The Church necessitate action to aid this community, to be the good neighbour we espouse from our pulpits every Sunday.

Remembering Our Sisters - MMIWG2S+ Report